The End of Fred Phelps, Founder of the Westboro Baptist Church

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There isn’t a person in America, I don’t think, who doesn’t recognize the name of the Westboro Baptist Church. They are responsible for the “God Hates Fags” campaign, as well as other atrocities such as “Thank God For Dead Soldiers.”

I’ve learned tonight that the founder, Fred Phelps, is on his death bead in Topeka, KS. He’s currently in hospice.

Also, according to his son, Nathan Phelps, Fred Phelps had been ex-communicated from the “church” in August of 2013. What does this mean for him and his life’s work? Does he believe his mission has failed, then?

The family is currently keeping any members who left the family from seeing the dying man. This is a sad thing, and difficult, I’m sure, but it’s pretty common with cult cultures.

We should never wish ill on anyone, even one as horrible as this, but I can safely say that few tears will be shed with his passing.

Nathan Phelps’ original post:

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Contributor: Robert Sacerich

Robert is a Philosophy of Science and Bioethics student, as well as blogger and science advocate/activist. He has worked extensively within the secular community for various secular nonprofit organizations and public communication causes.

See his full bio!

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9 thoughts on “The End of Fred Phelps, Founder of the Westboro Baptist Church

  1. “We should never wish ill on anyone” you seem like a rather nice younger person. that’s good, but also naive. good doesn’t always win out, the truth doesn’t always set you free, good people go to jail for crimes they didn’t commit. i imagine some or all of these experiences are foreign to you, which is why you might say something like what you say in that quote. i would suggest to you that there is no such thing as a knight in shining armor. the hubris to think one shouldn’t revel in a bit of schadenfreude can belong only to the inexperienced. i oddly find myself hoping that this doesn’t change for you–it would be nice to live in a world where even an enemy’s passing doesn’t affect us in this way, even if that world is a pipe dream. in the meantime, tell me where his grave is, and i’ll dance a fucking jig on it. sadly, some of us have to be as despicable as they are, else, people like you couldn’t have that particular pipe dream.

    • Your list of insults and assumptions of who I am or what I know speak volumes, but those aside, I still don’t wish ill on anyone. Yes, some people should be imprisoned for their crimes. Phelps, considering the physical and emotional abuse he’s inflicted on his family, should absolutely be imprisoned for his crimes. Wishing death on him, or celebrating death, makes you no better than he.

      I’m sorry that you’re so embittered you felt the need to post the rather judgemental and ill conceived spattering of words you posted here. I still don’t wish you ill, however. I tend to have ethics and morals. But if, as you say, some of us have to be as despicable as they are, then you’re doing just fine. Cheers!

      • Archive this thread and come back to it in ten years. Life has a funny way of changing your prospective after a while. The previous commenter was not insulting you, though you seem to have taken it that way. I used to be a lot like you when I was in my early/mid twenties, and likely would have reacted to that commender the same way you did. Just try to remember that your demeanor, values, looks, and dare I say ego will not always be as it is now. Everyone changes as they go through life, and even if you don’t end up feeling the way the commenter did about the deaths of horrible human beings, you will likely understand where he or she was coming from.

      • Oh, I understand perfectly where he’s coming from, and as a person with a Humanistic worldview, I absolutely don’t agree. Again, you’re someone making assumptions about who I am, what I know, or what my history is. I’s almost amusing how much that’s happening today. I’ll stand by the fact that wishing ill on others is unethical, and puts you in the same category as the people you so despise, and I’ve stood by that for many, many years. But thank you for assuming you know the first thing about me and what I do and will eventually believe. Good on ya!

      • Ok, take it as an attack then. Some people need to feel persecuted, I guess. Still wish I could talk to you about in in ten years. I see that strict humanistic worldview is as strong in the twenty-somethings as it was when I was that age. And it might be a good thing. As the other commenter mentioned, the world would be a better place if we all shared your worldview. Sadly, father time is a grizzled old bastard.

        I will leave you with one more thought: you can instantly know an awful lot about the person who claims that you don’t know them.

      • See, this is what I’m talking about with assumptions. I left 20-something behind many years ago. I don’t need to feel persecuted, nor do I see it as an attack. I simple think that you’re wrong. and father time has only solidified that.

      • I took insults such as calling me naive or referring to my long held worldview as a pipe dream as pretty hostile, honestly. The rest was mostly just condescending and based on some vastly incorrect assumptions about be, which would be humorous if it wasn’t so annoyingly sad.

      • Yeah and maybe / probably condescending, but when I and I expect the others read it, I saw his focus on Phelps and how he makes people feel, not as an intentional put down of you although worded perhaps heavy handedly. Just saying as an outsider.

        On the other hand, if I were YOU I would get what you are saying also as it is frustrating when people who don’t know you insist on telling you who you are. I’ve had it and I set them straight too.

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